From the SoundProLive Bloggers

By: Steve Nazarian

The audio electronics company I worked for in the 1990s was called Crest Audio. I was hired to write the user manuals and promotional literature for a new series of mixing consoles called the “Century Series.”

 

This new line of consoles was a shift down market from the rarefied air that the company’s Gamble EX series occupied. As colorful and exciting as mixing consoles are, the company’s bread-and-butter was power amplifiers. Having been an innovator since the 1970s, the Crest had a reputation for building amplifiers of both the highest power and quality.

 

In 1987, Crest introduced the Professional Series 8001 amplifier. At the time it delivered the most power in the smallest package and it did it while sounding… well, awesome.

So I had to ask myself why fix it if it ain’t broke? Is knowing when your mix is in the pocket an instinct? When the venue cooperates, the PA is phenomenal and the console is humming nicely why the need to “fix” it?

Hi Sue: I try to take care on the road and make sure all the stages are wired properly and all but every now and then

Jett’s long term goals are to be an independent and reputable audio mastering engineer with her own loyal clientele. 

I had a conversation with Paul Dieter, FOH engineer for Jackson Browne, at a show a few weeks ago and at some point, our conversation turned to our experiences in the early days of audio. It got me thinking…

Men are a little lower on the food chain. If it weren’t illegal, men would simply throw rocks at men that they don’t like. But we can’t do that. So we give nicknames.

We went into many venues totally blind. There is the time in Tennessee where the contact just could not tell me what exactly was in the club in terms of staging or PA. But he told me “don’t worry.”  Well those words MAKE ME WORRY!

Gear Reviews

Has it really been more than six months since Winter NAMM? Dang.

Over a period of several months, we both used the IEMs in a number of settings. And we chatted about the results. Instead of presenting two separate reviews, we are going to give you a transcript of the conversation. And away we go.

The guys at VUE Audiotechnik asked us if we would test the phase coherence of the VUE  h15-W against a Meyer CQ. I will gladly oblige because there is nothing subjective about this test. 

As some of you may know (those of you smart enough to be following SoundProLive) H.A.S. has been