The following retraction was released by infoComm earlier today…

InfoComm Retracts InfoComm 2013 Medical Alert

Yesterday, InfoComm International was informed that a participant at our recent InfoComm 2013 trade show was diagnosed with Legionnaires’ Disease. Fortunately, InfoComm just received news that the participant has been rediagnosed, and does not have Legionnaires’ or any other communicable disorder. Our member is being hospitalized this week, but is on the mend.

InfoComm thanks the Orange County Convention Center and the Holiday Inn Resort – Castle for their exemplary professionalism in the face of a potential public health crisis. 

While InfoComm regrets causing worry amongst InfoComm 2013 participants, the health and safety of our community is paramount. We hope that you will able to look back on your InfoComm 2013 experience with fond memories.

ORIGINAL STORY:

Today InfoComm International was informed that a participant at our recent InfoComm 2013 trade show was diagnosed with Legionnaires’ Disease.  Our member is being hospitalized this week and all of us at InfoComm are hoping for a full and speedy recovery.

Upon learning this news, InfoComm immediately checked in with the Orange County Convention Center and was told that no other cases have been reported.  InfoComm also contacted the Holiday Inn Resort – Castle, where the guest lodged during the trade show, to see if additional incidents have been reported. At this time, we have not received confirmation of further reports.

Most people exposed to bacteria do not become ill.  However, if you attended InfoComm 2013 and are suffering from symptoms of Legionnaires’ Disease, please seek immediate medical attention and mention that you may have been exposed to the Legionella bacteria. Signs of the disease can include a high fever, chills, cough, and fatigue or weakness. Some people may also suffer from muscle aches and headaches. Chest X-rays are needed to find the pneumonia caused by the bacteria, and other tests can be done to find evidence of the bacteria in the body. These symptoms usually begin two to 14 days after being exposed to the bacteria.

Each year, between 8,000 and 18,000 people are hospitalized with Legionnaires’ disease in the U.S. More illness is usually found in the summer and early fall, but it can happen any time of the year.

If you attended InfoComm 2013 and a medical professional diagnoses you with Legionnaires’ Disease, please have an associate contact me at InfoComm International at bjaffe@infocomm.org or at +1 571.265.8590.